Hopefulness, the Ignatian Way

Matterofprayer: A Year of Everyday Prayers – Sunday, May 31, 2015

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Hopefulness, the Ignatian Way

I like Ignatian prayer and spirituality. I really, really do.

I find Ignatian prayer and meditation come naturally to me. I feel it deeply. In fact, sometimes I just can’t pray in this particular fashion, so I need to choose another, less feeling- and emotion-oriented way

This time of prayer is special to all who follow St. Ignatius of Loyola, in particular those who experience the parts of the Daily Examen. We turn in the book Inner Compass to the author’s understanding of the daily manner of prayer.

We have gotten to the last step of this progress, called Hopefulness. “Look forward to tomorrow. Ask [God] to open your eye to whatever surprises it may bring; to open your eyes to notice Him in unexpected places. . . . Whatever inadequacies you find in your day’s living, let them be there before God now, not for judgment.” [1]

What I gather from this paragraph is to be positive. Yes, we do need to think about whatever is going on in each one’s lives. Positive or negative, simple or complex. I am used to living and considering one day at a time—today. This is a beneficial way of going about “life,” for me.

However, this Hopefulness step also urges me to consider tomorrow—with hope. I especially appreciate Margaret Silf’s words, telling me to open my eyes, to notice God in unexpected places. I earnestly pray that I can be this hopeful in prayer.

We end this season of Ignatian prayer and spirituality with today’s post. I also ask that each one who is taking this way of praying to heart find encouragement and support. Lord, in Your mercy, hear my prayers. Hear all of our prayers.

@chaplaineliza

Like what you read? Disagree? Share your thoughts with your loved ones and continue the conversation.

Why not visit my sister blogs, “the best of” A Year of Being Kind.   @chaplaineliza And, read my sermons from Pastor, Preacher Pray-er .

[1] Silf, Margaret, Inner Compass: Introduction to Ignatian Spirituality (Chicago: Loyola Press, 1999), 59.

 

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