Embrace the Everyday Presence of the Sacred

Matterofprayer: A Year of Everyday Prayers – Thursday, June 4, 2015

Clipart Illustration  -  Black And White Senior Couple

Clipart Illustration –
Black And White Senior Couple

Embrace the Everyday Presence of the Sacred

Each day, every day, we are presented with all number of choices. Each thing, every facet of day-to-day life is potentially sacred. Hallowed. Such qualities as beauty, intimacy, community and imagination. All of these can be blessed, and a way of accessing the soul within.

Divinity? What is that? How is divinity quantified? How much does it weigh? What color is it?

I don’t think the writer of our chapter for today—Thomas Moore—would look upon divinity or soul in such a quantitative, measurable way, either. Yet, he describes soul—divinity—as an everyday function. We ought to be able to find it in ordinary experiences, and circumstances.

The problem is that so many people are so far from any idea of the soul, at all. Oblivious, really.

As Thomas Moore says, “When we are so estranged from the everyday presence of the sacred, how can we rekindle a relationship with the soul? There are many ways, though they’re not necessarily easy. A good beginning is to stop what we’re doing every so often—take time out from the crazy pace we’re caught up in—and use that time to contemplate, whether through formal meditation, or by talking to each other more deeply, or simply by enjoying nature.” [1]

Oh, I need to slow down and pay attention to the everyday happenings of the day. Look more closely and celebrate each one’s blessed ordinary-ness. I need to care for my soul, using everyday things. Activities. Meditation and prayer. Yes, celebrate the everyday people, too. Like me.

@chaplaineliza

Like what you read? Disagree? Share your thoughts with your loved ones and continue the conversation.

Why not visit my sister blogs, “the best of” A Year of Being Kind.   @chaplaineliza And, read my sermons from Pastor, Preacher Pray-er .

[1] Handbook for the Soul, Richard Carlson and Benjamin Shield, editors. (Boston: Little, Brown & Co., 1995), 27.

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