Hannah More, from the Heart

Matterofprayer: A Year of Everyday Prayers – Thursday, May 25, 2017

1 Cor 10-13 no temptation

Hannah More, from the Heart

Hannah More lived from 1745 to 1833, and was known as a poet, playwright and writer. She was noted in English literary circles, but was uncomfortable with the literary scene. Increasingly evangelical and spiritual, she became more and more active against slavery. She also became well known as a Christian writer, and began schools for poor children in the area near Bristol.

In the excerpt in this anthology, Hannah More wrote about Practical Piety, talking about small virtues and small faults. “The acquisition of even the smallest virtue is actually a conquest over the opposite vice and doubles our moral strength.” [1]

This brings to mind the verse from 1 Corinthians 10, where Paul reminds us that God provides a way out from any temptation that overtakes us. More gives further explanation about several faults. Procrastination, indecision, idleness, vanity, irritability, and trifling. “He who made us best knows of what we are made. Our compassionate High Priest will bear with much infirmity and will pardon much involuntary weakness.” [2]

More tells us that if we—fallible us—do acts of service, those acts bear the true character of the love of God. Upon reflection, Richard Foster says that “these thousands upon thousands of little actions of righteousness and peace and joy in the Holy Spirit slowly but surely change our heart. More than any other thing, the small corners of life reveal who we really are.” [3]

Dear God, thank You for giving fallible-me some hope. Compassionate Lord, help me to act in righteous ways, full of peace and joy. Hear me, I pray.

@chaplaineliza

 

Like what you read? Disagree? Share your thoughts with your loved ones and continue the conversation.

Why not visit my companion blogs, “the best of” A Year of Being Kind.  #PursuePEACE. My Facebook page, Pursuing Peace – Thanks! And, read my sermons from Pastor, Preacher Pray-er

[1] Spiritual Classics, edited by Richard J. Foster and Emilie Griffin. (San Francisco, California: HarperSanFrancisco, 2000, 347.

[2] Ibid, 349.

[3] Ibid, 351.

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