Tag Archives: Ignatian prayer

Prayer: Rest in God

Matterofprayer: A Year of Everyday Prayers – Tuesday, February 5, 2019

John 14 Good Shepherd, print

Prayer: Rest in God

The quote at the beginning of the first chapter, “What I Wish and Desire,” is from St. Anselm. He mentions “Make a little time for God and rest in Him.” [1] I came to a full stop when I read those words. Both phrases. First and foremost, I need to make a little time for God regularly. I need to make this happen in my life.

Sure, when I pray with my friends from Morning Prayer online (from www.dailyoffice.org), this is my go-to, wonderful online prayer group. But, I need some kind of regular individual prayer, too. This regular prayer time has been such a difficulty for me for years. My life is, frankly, somewhat chaotic. I have no ordered daily activities. Weekly activities, yes. But, not a daily, everyday routine that I can count on. (Again frankly, I do not think I would be likely to keep such a routine up, on a daily basis.)

However, I see the deep need inside of me for some kind of prayer, personal and individual prayer, on a regular basis. Perhaps that is why I come back to Ignatian prayer and meditation, again and again.

The second part of this quote from St. Anselm tells me to “rest in God.” Oh, what an inviting image! What a welcoming, encouraging thought, too. Immediately, I am drawn to the image of the lush green pasture and the cool, clear pool of water that I have seen when praying Psalm 23 (in Ignatian prayer, of course). Oh, dear Lord, would that I be able to rest in You whenever I have need!

With St. Anselm, I do pray to seek God. I hope and pray that through this book, this Ignatian guide of praying with Scripture, I might have the joy and delight of spending time with God, just God and me. Lord, You know my heart. You know that I need to find regular time with You, one on one. Help me to rest in You, delight in Your presence, and rejoice to find that green pasture and pool of water You have intended just for me. You intend it for all of us. It’s in Jesus’s name, the name of the Good Shepherd, I pray. Amen.

Like what you read? Disagree? Share your thoughts with your loved ones and continue the conversation.

Why not visit my companion blogs, “the best of” A Year of Being Kind.  #PursuePEACE. My Facebook page, Pursuing Peace – Thanks! And, read my sermons from Pastor, Preacher Pray-er

[1] Meditation and Contemplation: An Ignatian Guide to Praying with Scripture, Timothy M. Gallagher, OVM (United States of America: Crossroad Publishing, 2008), 19.

Prayer: Meditation and Contemplation

Matterofprayer: A Year of Everyday Prayers – Thursday, January 31, 2019

lordhearourprayer

Prayer: Meditation and Contemplation

Praying with Scripture can be moving, inspiring, soul-shaking, or heart-piercing. Sometimes, several of these at once or in succession.

I’m not saying that St. Ignatius had a corner on this praying-with-Scripture thing, but he certainly was able to guide people into the practice. That’s the reason “Ignatian prayer” is named exactly that. I love to use this kind of prayer, and I have had deep spiritual encounters while using it.

The two halves of the Ignatian-prayer-whole are meditation and contemplation, both using Scripture as a basis for going in-depth in prayer. Fr. Gallagher is basing his approach in this book on St. Ignatius’ own words and method, as follows:

“I will consider how God our Lord looks upon me.”

“I offer all my will and actions to God. (preparatory prayer) I review the Scripture for this prayer. I imaginatively enter the place of this Scripture. (composition) I ask of God what I wish and desire in this prayer.”

In meditation, for each point “I call to mind this truth, with love. I ponder it, with love. I embrace it, with love and desire.” In contemplation, for each point “I see the persons. I hear the words. I observe the actions.” And, after each session of prayer, I speak to God as my heart is moved (colloquy). [1]

Such a simple manner of prayer. Yet, how deep. Talk about being pushed into the deep end of the pool! I can still vividly remember an Ignatian prayer session I participated in, where I could feel the dusty dryness of the street and the jostling of the crowd. I remember the excited buzz of conversation as I led a group of moms (at a mothers’ bible study) through an Ignatian prayer exercise on Jesus and the disciples out on the sea of Galilee in a storm, and how several of my fellow moms were astounded by the depth of the prayer experience.

While I realize that kind of experience may not be an every-day sort of thing, still. Ignatian prayer does offer the possibility and opportunity of having that kind of prayer time. God willing, I would like to have those experiences more often than I do right now. Dear Lord, as I work through this helpful book, lead us all in Ignatian prayer. Guide us as we come into Your presence. It is in the name of Your blessed Son we pray, amen.

@chaplaineliza

 

Like what you read? Disagree? Share your thoughts with your loved ones and continue the conversation.

Why not visit my companion blogs, “the best of” A Year of Being Kind.  #PursuePEACE. My Facebook page, Pursuing Peace – Thanks! And, read my sermons from Pastor, Preacher Pray-er

 

[1] Meditation and Contemplation: An Ignatian Guide to Praying with Scripture, Timothy M. Gallagher, OVM (United States of America: Crossroad Publishing, 2008), 16-17.

Love Prayer with Scripture

Matterofprayer: A Year of Everyday Prayers – Thursday, January 24, 2019

bible still life, van gogh

Love Prayer with Scripture

I love praying in the Ignatian way. Some of the most meaningful and memorable times of prayer I have had in recent years have been while praying using St. Ignatius’ suggestions of imagery and guidance with Scripture.

However—I do not pray in this way often enough. Why is it that I do not? (This is not a rhetorical question. I really, honestly wonder.) Why don’t I pray regularly in a manner that has proven itself meaningful to my heart and spirit, again and again?

My regular prayer life has shifted, though. When I was a chaplain, for almost ten years, I found it easier to keep the rhythms of prayer—and more innovative prayer styles—in my life. Not that I have ever found it easy to pray, but as I reflect, I find it was easier. Or, more straightforward. Somehow, less complicated.

I am also reflecting on my calling as a local church pastor. In March, in less than two months, I will celebrate my fifth anniversary at that UCC church in the Chicago suburbs. I love what I am doing now! Yes, I loved my position as a hospital and care center chaplain, and I love being a small church pastor, too. Except—now that my responsibilities have shifted, I seem to not have as much of the focus on my personal times of prayer.

One thing that does help me in my corporate prayer life is my (semi) regular attendance at Morning Prayer online. I am privileged to meet with an Episcopal website and ministry called www.dailyoffice.org for prayer several mornings a week. (I know I’ve spoken about them before on this blog.) Vicar Josh and the other friends at the Daily Office Network are a wonderful, supportive group of people. God bless them!

But, that still does not explain why I do not pray regularly in the Ignatian way. Perhaps that is why I have picked up this slim volume and am reading and blogging my way through it. Dear Lord, help me to be more regular in my personal prayer times with You. Help me to use this marvelous manner of praying that St. Ignatius advocated—regularly. I know You want me to be in regular contact with You. Help me—help all of us—come before You as trusting children, in prayer. In Jesus’ blessed name we pray, amen.

@chaplaineliza

 

Like what you read? Disagree? Share your thoughts with your loved ones and continue the conversation.

Why not visit my companion blogs, “the best of” A Year of Being Kind.  #PursuePEACE. My Facebook page, Pursuing Peace – Thanks! And, read my sermons from Pastor, Preacher Pray-er

 

 

World of Imagination in Prayer

Matterofprayer: A Year of Everyday Prayers – Thursday, January 17, 2019

ignatian prayer word cloud

World of Imagination in Prayer

I love to imagine things. Ever since I was a little girl, I’ve had an extremely active imagination. (Some might say an overactive imagination.) Perhaps that is why I love using Ignatian prayer. Using my senses and using my brain together in prayer seem to be a marvelous combination. Maybe not for everyone, but it is so for me.

As I get down to praying (in the Ignatian way), “the clarity that emerges is invaluable. It allows a solidly grounded use of these methods, with flexibility, as the Spirit draws us individually.” [1] Whether I imagine the heat and dust of an outdoor market where Jesus and His disciples are traveling, or whether the crowd presses against me as I wait and watch Jesus passing by, it does not matter. I may read the Psalms and be transported into the sadness and fear of the psalmist, and sometimes not be able to quickly separate myself from that experience.

Yes, I can readily intellectualize my Bible reading, to the point where the Bible becomes sterile and stuffy. However, I am saved from over-intellectualizing. Ignatian prayer saves me from that, and allows me to immerse myself (and my imagination) in the Bible reading of the day.

St. Ignatius loved to make use of the Gospels in Ignatian prayer—active, imaginative participation in these Biblical events. “Direct contact with his words opens for us the full richness and endless freshness of this teaching.” [2]

It has been about ten or eleven years since I made my way through the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius. The richness of that experience only whetted my appetite all the more for Ignatian prayer. I am so looking forward to this how-to book on prayer. I hope and pray I can help a few others, in these brief articles.

Dear Lord, in Your mercy, hear our prayers.
@chaplaineliza

 

Like what you read? Disagree? Share your thoughts with your loved ones and continue the conversation.

Why not visit my companion blogs, “the best of” A Year of Being Kind.  #PursuePEACE. My Facebook page, Pursuing Peace – Thanks! And, read my sermons from Pastor, Preacher Pray-er

[1] Meditation and Contemplation: An Ignatian Guide to Praying with Scripture, Timothy M. Gallagher, OVM (United States of America: Crossroad Publishing, 2008), 10.

[2] Ibid, 11.

Two Building Blocks of Prayer

Matterofprayer: A Year of Everyday Prayers – Sunday, January 13, 2019

bricks drawing

Two Building Blocks of Prayer

I have found another book on prayer. In keeping with my ecumenical teaching and training, I’ve chosen a book by a Catholic priest, Father Timothy Gallagher, OMV. This book on prayer is subtitled “An Ignatian Guide to Praying with Scripture.”

I love Ignatian prayer. I love reading and pondering over Scripture. I am excited to begin reading this guide to prayer, using two of my familiar and favorite ways.

In the Introduction, Fr. Gallagher relates how he came to learn to pray. His first teacher was St. Francis de Sales. Through reading his Introduction to the Devout Life, and practicing the meditations outlined for beginners, Fr. Gallagher began learning the way of meditative prayer.

Next, Fr. Gallagher experienced the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius of Loyola, and delved deeper into St. Ignatius’ counsels on prayer. Fr. Gallagher said, “When the retreat ended, I thought, ‘Someone has finally taught me to pray.’ … Ignatius’s clear and practical counsels opened for me, as for so many before me, a sure path of prayer.” [1]

In this slim guidebook to prayer, “Our focus will be the two basic Ignatian methods for prayer with Scripture: meditation, the reflective approach, and contemplation, the imaginative approach….Through different gateways, both lead to the heart.” [2] This book will assist me in striving to have a regular practice of prayer. Yet again.

I’ve spoken here about my ups and downs with a regular prayer practice, for decades. God and I have had many conversations about how I fail to pray regularly. At least in that I am consistent.

As I begin this new year in prayer, I will not use an unfamiliar way of praying, or a manner of prayer that is more challenging to me. No, I will fall back on two ways of praying that I really enjoy. Dear Lord, help me to be able to be more consistent in prayer to You. Thank You for Your patience and love extended to me, a fallible, imperfect, stumbling and stammering praying novice. For, that is exactly what I feel I am. Even though I have been praying for decades—more than forty years—I still feel woefully inadequate. I come to You with Fr. Gallagher’s book in hand, and allow this book to assist me to come before You in prayer, and in spirit and truth. It’s in Your dear name I pray, amen.

@chaplaineliza

 

Like what you read? Disagree? Share your thoughts with your loved ones and continue the conversation.

Why not visit my companion blogs, “the best of” A Year of Being Kind.  #PursuePEACE. My Facebook page, Pursuing Peace – Thanks! And, read my sermons from Pastor, Preacher Pray-er

[1] Meditation and Contemplation: An Ignatian Guide to Praying with Scripture, Timothy M. Gallagher, OVM (United States of America: Crossroad Publishing, 2008), 10.

[2] Ibid.

Hopefulness, the Ignatian Way

Matterofprayer: A Year of Everyday Prayers – Sunday, May 31, 2015

hope hope hope

Hopefulness, the Ignatian Way

I like Ignatian prayer and spirituality. I really, really do.

I find Ignatian prayer and meditation come naturally to me. I feel it deeply. In fact, sometimes I just can’t pray in this particular fashion, so I need to choose another, less feeling- and emotion-oriented way

This time of prayer is special to all who follow St. Ignatius of Loyola, in particular those who experience the parts of the Daily Examen. We turn in the book Inner Compass to the author’s understanding of the daily manner of prayer.

We have gotten to the last step of this progress, called Hopefulness. “Look forward to tomorrow. Ask [God] to open your eye to whatever surprises it may bring; to open your eyes to notice Him in unexpected places. . . . Whatever inadequacies you find in your day’s living, let them be there before God now, not for judgment.” [1]

What I gather from this paragraph is to be positive. Yes, we do need to think about whatever is going on in each one’s lives. Positive or negative, simple or complex. I am used to living and considering one day at a time—today. This is a beneficial way of going about “life,” for me.

However, this Hopefulness step also urges me to consider tomorrow—with hope. I especially appreciate Margaret Silf’s words, telling me to open my eyes, to notice God in unexpected places. I earnestly pray that I can be this hopeful in prayer.

We end this season of Ignatian prayer and spirituality with today’s post. I also ask that each one who is taking this way of praying to heart find encouragement and support. Lord, in Your mercy, hear my prayers. Hear all of our prayers.

@chaplaineliza

Like what you read? Disagree? Share your thoughts with your loved ones and continue the conversation.

Why not visit my sister blogs, “the best of” A Year of Being Kind.   @chaplaineliza And, read my sermons from Pastor, Preacher Pray-er .

[1] Silf, Margaret, Inner Compass: Introduction to Ignatian Spirituality (Chicago: Loyola Press, 1999), 59.

 

Sorrow, Healing, Forgiveness—in Prayer

Matterofprayer: A Year of Everyday Prayers – Saturday, May 30, 2015

FORGIVE thanks for the beautiful life, forgive me for not loving

Sorrow, Healing, Forgiveness—in Prayer

After spending the last few days with my daughter in Washington D.C., I am back at home. Preparing for service tomorrow, and getting ready to preach a sermon for Trinity Sunday.

However—I need to give another installment of Ignatian prayer, meditation and spirituality. I know we have barely scratched the surface of Margaret Silf’s book Inner Compass and the helpful ways she lifted up St. Ignatius and his manner of prayer. We are almost finished with the month of May, and another mode of prayer awaits us for June.

We will take a closer look at the next step in what Silf imagines as St. Ignatius’ Daily Examen, the examination of the internal workings of our intellects, feelings, our very souls.

The next step is Sorrow. “With hindsight you may realize that much of your reaction to the events of the day has been centered on your own kingdom. . . . Whatever inadequacies you find in your day’s living, let them be there before God now, not for judgment, but for His Spirit to hover over the mess, bringing wholeness out of brokenness. Express your sorrow to God, and confidently ask for His healing and forgiveness.” [1]

I see this as a healthy sorrow, not a constant or continual recitation of every single, minute sin ever committed (or omitted). God’s grace and mercy are wider, deeper, and more comprehensive than anything I could have ever imagined.

Yes, we can discuss this tremendous grace and mercy, but I suspect this needs to be felt. Not just intellect, but feelings and emotions, too.

Praise God. Help me to see my inadequacies and sinful behavior, dear God. As John 3:17 says, God did not send His Son into the world to condemn the world, but that the world through Him might be saved. Thank You, Jesus, for extending Your grace and mercy to all those who are anxious and worried. Thanks, God!

. @chaplaineliza

Like what you read? Disagree? Share your thoughts with your loved ones and continue the conversation.

Why not visit my sister blogs, “the best of” A Year of Being Kind.   @chaplaineliza And, read my sermons from Pastor, Preacher Pray-er .

[1] Silf, Margaret, Inner Compass: Introduction to Ignatian Spirituality (Chicago: Loyola Press, 1999), 59